Design for Print Collections

  • I wanted to develop a series of patterns that speak to the aspirational travel destinations that I hope to someday adventure to: Peru, Greece and New Zealand. These diverse regions all have specific geographical features, but I found the meandering forms a continuous theme amongst all three locations. I aim to explore every nook and cranny when I travel, and wanted the print collection to evoke a sense of visual wandering. Each unique winding landscape had an interesting specific area of focus for investigation, from manmade globular architecture to naturally formed snaking waterways. The end usage of the series would be in application of a women's trench coat, where the dynamic pathways could lend themselves to express female curvature. 
     
     
     
  • [Full print collection in travel trench application]
  • [Inspiration board for travel destination of Peru, repeated meandering organic and manmade forms were a dominant focus]
  • [27"x18" singular half-drop repeat of the Peruvian landscape]
  • [Application sketch and pattern in repeat]
  • [Inspiration board for travel destination of Greece, layered architecture elements and winding alleys as an area of focus for motifs]
  • [27"x18" singular half-drop repeat of the Grecian landscape]
  • [Application sketch and pattern in repeat]
  • [Inspiration board for travel destination of New Zealand, organic passageways and tiers of elevation serve as a primary focus]
  • [27"x18" singular half-drop repeat of the New Zealand landscape]
  • [Application sketch and pattern in repeat]
  • The Designing Traditions project was a collaboration with the RISD Museum, and served as a unique opportunity to re-innovate a piece from a curated body of work from the Costume and Textiles Collection. I was drawn towards an early 20th century Japanese Shifu Hanten, a seemingly simple looking garment that was comprised of plain weave structure and dyed a deep shade of indigo. I wanted to investigate the transformative process that took the artisans to make the garment, from the very roots and develop into a print collection. The bast fiber that comprises the garment is sourced from a paper mulberry plant, and features an array of vibrant blossoms. I used these saturated bursts of colors as a dominant motif in my artwork. The fibers of the plant are compressed into a traditional Japanese tissue paper, that is then cut into strips and twisted into yarn. I incorporated these symbolic tendrils to entangle around the repeat and colored them in an ombre of blue shades to show a sense of space. I thought the concept of representing a garment with such an inherent identity that is so rich in process, yet cloaked by simplicity, would be interesting to exploit in a composition.
  • [Full print collection in dress application]
  • [Inspiration board featuring the transformative identity of the paper mulberry plant that eventually is processed into paper yarn used for the referenced garment, a shifu hanten.]
  • [27"x18" singular straight repeat of the paper mulberry twisting motifs]
  • [Application sketch and pattern in repeat]
  • [18"x12" singular half-drop repeat of the entangled paper mulberry blossoms]
  • [Application sketch and pattern in repeat]
  • [27"x 24" singular half-drop repeat of luminescent fabrics infused with colors of the blossoms]
  • [Application sketch and pattern in repeat]